Greenpeace Day 2021

September 2021

Greenpeace Day 2021
2021 has thus far seen a range of dramatic weather events. We’ve seen the apocalyptic rain in Germany and parts of Belgium and the Netherlands that claimed 200 lives. Click into this Economist article and you’ll see a photograph that will take your breath away – but not in a good way. It rams home the unimaginable destruction they’ve suffered there. We’ve seen too the fearful fires blazing across the Mediterranean region, resulting from record-breaking summer heatwaves.  All of which has prompted me to flag up Greenpeace Day 2001 which is on the 15th September. And hot on its heels from the 20th – 26th September is national recycling week.

Now is the time to tackle climate change

On their website Greenpeace say: 2021: Now is the time to tackle the climate, nature and health emergencies.

‘Despite the turbulence of the last year, 2020 has shown the power of humanity to come together when faced with a crisis. It’s precisely that spirit we urgently need to solve the climate, nature and health emergencies that threaten us all.’

For those of us not as young as once we were, we’re less likely to be around when the worst ravages of climate change hit our land. But they will – one way or another – they will. And our children and our grandchildren most certainly will have to deal with the consequences of our lack of action. The Greenpeace page about plastic pollution alone makes for horrifying reading. ‘… A truckload of plastic enters the ocean every single minute and UK supermarkets produce 800,000 tonnes every year. With production increasing, that’s set to rise.’

Greenpeace Day 2021 - Greenpeace ship Arctic Sunrise

What can we do?

Well, as Greenpeace point out, the ideal is to produce less plastic in the first place. And in the meantime, recycle and repurpose more and use less where we can.

Indeed,we’ve visited the wider recycling topic before. Last year we published a blog about global recycling day in which we discussed the merits or otherwise of our packaging and our footprint. We’ve made some changes – but there’s work still to do.

When it comes to recycling and any other measures we might practice in relation to reducing our personal contribution to climate change, we can all point the finger of hypocrisy. But the important thing, we think, is that we’re aware and that we’re making changes where we can. Because if we all do that it will surely all add up and make a difference?

When it comes to recycling and any other measures we might practice in relation to reducing our personal contribution to climate change, we can all point the finger of hypocrisy. But the important thing, we think, is that we’re aware and that we’re making changes where we can. Because if we all do that it will surely all add up and make a difference?

Indeed, to that end, friend of Pink&Green, Born Again Swindonian has made two changes to her shopping habits to reduce her single-use plastic waste. She’s now buying her toilet rolls on postal subscription from Who Gives a Crap. The company is B Corp certified apropos its social and environmental impacts. And besides that, it does earnest good works, using a proportion of their profits to build toilets where they’re needed.  And her wash liquid capsules also come in the post from Smol. As you can see from the image below, that’s a lot of plastic saved.

Actions such as these are easy to take and can even make our lives easier not harder. As Born Again Swindonian pointed out: ‘that’s a whole lot of shopping I don’t have to hump home. And as a non-driver, carrying shopping home, that’s a big plus. So, this is a wonderful win-win.’

Greenpeace Day 2021 - smol packaging

On a local level, Swindon Borough Council is running a climate change campaign called Be the Change. Its aim is to encourage Swindonians to put climate change at the heart of their daily lives.

Are you being the change at all?

We’ve seen a couple of things that Born Again Swindonian is doing in her daily life. How about you? Have you made any changes in your shopping habits or personal life to make a positive contribution to climate change? Let us know – we’d love to hear from you on this.

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